I LIKE GOOD STORIES, CREATIVE SOLUTIONS, TECHNOLOGY AND PEOPLE.

Jul 16, 2014

Aurora L - Weaver of Bankable Yarn

My latest subject is someone that I can truly relate to. We met in a writing class three years ago and have encouraged and sometimes challenged each other to write, ever since. Her snapshot was surprisingly hard to nail down, most likely because I think that writers sometimes hide their own essence in order to shape shift for the sake of the story.

AURORA - WEAVER OF BANKABLE YARN

Aurora is a prolific weaver of the most bankable yarn. Like all great writers, the fact that she’s a gifted wordsmith is only a small part of the equation. She falls in love, at least a little bit, with everyone she meets. When you’re around her, you can’t help but feel interesting and beautiful. She asks lots of questions. She is genuinely interested in the answers. She knows that a good story, well told, is what makes anyone invest in anything - from a tee shirt, a piece of jewelry or even, an online diet plan. It’s emotional. This makes her an invaluable asset to the brands that she works with, who benefit from her love of stories, romantic nature and a natural way with words. With experience as the in-house multimedia storyteller for fashion, beauty, and lifestyle brands, Aurora has seen her words translate to business growth because her words are the ones that facilitate not just transactions, but long lasting relationships.

fastcompany:

Could you walk away from a job that paid more than half a million a year? That’s what Kathryn Cicoletti did when she created MakinSense Babe, a video-driven site that translates financial news and investment advice into language that everyone can understand. Described by Forbes as “The Daily Show, but swap out Jon Stewart for an attractive blonde using clever analogies and wry wit to simplify financial topics,” Cicoletti’s videos skewer the mainstream financial industry, while making savvy investors of her subscribers.

"I spent a lot of time looking at the landscape to see what is out there and what other people were doing. I wanted to be sure that I was coming at finance and money topics from a different angle. I love the idea of taking things that are generally boring—sorry, finance is really boring, let’s be honest—and making them entertaining.”
Read More>
Jul 16, 2014 / 96 notes

fastcompany:

Could you walk away from a job that paid more than half a million a year? That’s what Kathryn Cicoletti did when she created MakinSense Babe, a video-driven site that translates financial news and investment advice into language that everyone can understand. Described by Forbes as “The Daily Show, but swap out Jon Stewart for an attractive blonde using clever analogies and wry wit to simplify financial topics,” Cicoletti’s videos skewer the mainstream financial industry, while making savvy investors of her subscribers.

image

"I spent a lot of time looking at the landscape to see what is out there and what other people were doing. I wanted to be sure that I was coming at finance and money topics from a different angle. I love the idea of taking things that are generally boring—sorry, finance is really boring, let’s be honest—and making them entertaining.”

Read More>

fastcompany:

One suggestion is to turn the Amazonian stadium into a giant jail. But two architects have a more positive idea: Why not convert part of the old stadiums into much-needed housing?
Read More>
Jul 16, 2014 / 253 notes

fastcompany:

One suggestion is to turn the Amazonian stadium into a giant jail. But two architects have a more positive idea: Why not convert part of the old stadiums into much-needed housing?

Read More>

humansofnewyork:

"I had a child when I was sixteen. I got kicked out of high school because of all the absences. My family and community pretty much wrote me off. But right away I got a job at a sporting goods store. Soon I was able to get a job as a receptionist at a tax company, and they gave me enough responsibilities that I learned how to do taxes. Eventually I learned enough to become an associate. Then I got offered a job at a smaller company, and even though it was a pay cut, they offered me responsibility over all the books— accounts payable, accounts receivable, everything. It was less money but I wanted that experience so I took the risk. And I’m so glad I did, because six months later, the controller of that company left and I was given that position. They told me they couldn’t officially call me the controller because I didn’t have a college degree. So I finished my degree 5 months ago— just to make it official! So after having a child at sixteen, I made it all the way to controller of a company, without even having a college degree. Can you believe that? Honestly, I’ve been waiting to tell that story so long that I told it to a customer service representative on the phone last week. She was nice about it and pretended to care."
Jul 1, 2014 / 53,413 notes

humansofnewyork:

"I had a child when I was sixteen. I got kicked out of high school because of all the absences. My family and community pretty much wrote me off. But right away I got a job at a sporting goods store. Soon I was able to get a job as a receptionist at a tax company, and they gave me enough responsibilities that I learned how to do taxes. Eventually I learned enough to become an associate. Then I got offered a job at a smaller company, and even though it was a pay cut, they offered me responsibility over all the books— accounts payable, accounts receivable, everything. It was less money but I wanted that experience so I took the risk. And I’m so glad I did, because six months later, the controller of that company left and I was given that position. They told me they couldn’t officially call me the controller because I didn’t have a college degree. So I finished my degree 5 months ago— just to make it official! So after having a child at sixteen, I made it all the way to controller of a company, without even having a college degree. Can you believe that? Honestly, I’ve been waiting to tell that story so long that I told it to a customer service representative on the phone last week. She was nice about it and pretended to care."

Bic ‘s universal typeface experiment aims to join the world in handwriting. Even though the site is a bit lumbering, it’s a gallant effort and is a huge data collection undertaking, with lots of potential applications.
A new font called “the universal typeface” is being crowdsourced by the pen company Bic.
Internet users from around the world can contribute to “the universal typeface experiment” by submitting a handwriting sample to the website theuniversaltypeface.com
An algorithm calculates the average styles from each submission and incorporates them into a continuously evolving font.
Stylistic features of the typeface can also be explored through categories such as age, gender and employment sector.
"Handwriting is personal and tactile — it is unique to each of us," asks the brand. "But what would the World’s collective handwriting look like?"
Users can still contribute their handwriting to the site, and the official typeface will be finalized and revealed in August.
Jun 19, 2014

Bic ‘s universal typeface experiment aims to join the world in handwriting. Even though the site is a bit lumbering, it’s a gallant effort and is a huge data collection undertaking, with lots of potential applications.

A new font called “the universal typeface” is being crowdsourced by the pen company Bic.

Internet users from around the world can contribute to “the universal typeface experiment” by submitting a handwriting sample to the website theuniversaltypeface.com

An algorithm calculates the average styles from each submission and incorporates them into a continuously evolving font.

Stylistic features of the typeface can also be explored through categories such as age, gender and employment sector.

"Handwriting is personal and tactile — it is unique to each of us," asks the brand. "But what would the World’s collective handwriting look like?"

Users can still contribute their handwriting to the site, and the official typeface will be finalized and revealed in August.




Jun 3, 2014 / 207 notes

vimeo:

The Christchurch Earthquake left the majority of its population devastated, but a small group of homeless people got a taste of what it’s like to be "Living Like Kings"  in this short piece.

This is just one of ten, must-see short docs about New Zealand in the Loading Doc series.

Jun 3, 2014 / 3,378 notes

dynamicafrica:

'Valencia' by Adriano Campos - Eduardo Filipe for Fucking Young! Online.

Minimalism meets Afrofuturism in a post-modernist architectural utopian tropical setting, featuring Eduardo Filipe photographed by Adriano Campos.

Filipe is  styled by Marília Estevam with pieces from Victor von Schwarz, Lacoste, Arturo Coronel, Alexander Wang, Guillem Rodríguez, Sandro, Joseph Abril, Lana Ivanova, João Pimenta and more.

I think hashtag activism should be used judiciously, especially when it comes to issues affecting the black community, at home and abroad. In some situations, it risks offering users of social media a false sense of accomplishment while obscuring underlying policy and structural issues as well as the full picture of what is taking place on the ground.

That’s why, after a few tweets, I ceased participating in the ongoing #BringBackOurGirls campaign, which is designed to highlight the plight of more than 200 Nigerian schoolgirls kidnapped by Boko Haram last month. I worried that this was becoming one of those situations in which people feel an unjustified sense of accomplishment.

[…]

But what would help? What are the other options? That’s a question I challenged myself to answer. Doing “something else” doesn’t have to mean picking up and moving to Nigeria or sleeping outside the embassy in a demand for action. One quick way to make a lasting difference in the conditions that led to this disaster would be to dedicate some time to learning more about the issue of abduction in Nigeria and in other areas of the world, so that comments and tweets are based on personal research, not just recycled demands.

If that’s too time-consuming, start following some of the people and organizations that are doing work on the ground so you know what’s happening even after Twitter moves on to the next trending topic. Commit to knowing what the United States can do to prevent the conditions that led to this disaster. Support non-governmental organizations and international groups that are fully dedicated to protecting and providing for girls around the world. We should arm ourselves with information and avenues for making an impact beyond just awareness. I’d personally rather see lasting social change in Nigeria than temporary, hashtag-inspired media attention. We know that never lasts long. Plus, the other amazing thing about the Internet is that we don’t need the media to be our middleman.

Quite a few people have asked me, both in person and online, what I’m doing as a Nigerian citizen to contribute to this situation, and frankly, besides keeping my eyes peeled on the news and doing my own research as I’ve always done concerning any issue about Nigeria throughout my life, there’s not much else I’ve done in the way of hashtag activism. Perhaps it’s because as a Nigerian who has both lived at home and abroad, as a Nigerian who endures the stigma attached with being Nigerian - from customs at the airport to casual conversations, as concerning as this kidnapping is, there’s a part of me that just doesn’t have the same amount energy as others might have to get reverently radical. Over the years, I’ve grown more and more tired and frustrated with Nigerian leadership that I often find myself being disappointingly indifferent to matters that concern my country. It’s not to say that I don’t care, believe me, I will ironically defend Nigeria ‘til my dying breath. But when your existence becomes a struggle on so many intersectional levels - being black, being a woman, being Nigerian, etc, there’s only so much fight and force you can give when matters of concern arrive.

There’s also a part of me that, as D.A. Lovell at The Root writes, does not necessarily buy the hype when it comes to hashtag activism.

I do, however, highly commend those who are providing much needed insight on the matter and are doing their best to not let this issue die a quick death.

(via dynamicafrica)

May 12, 2014 / 84 notes
May 6, 2014 / 7,688 notes

ucresearch:

You say hispanic, I say latino


Most use the words interchangeably these days, but the “hispanic” identity originated from an initiative in the 1970s to give Latin American’s in the United States a more unified voice in politics. UC Berkeley sociologist Cristina Mora talks about the positives and negatives of this distinction in her new book:

You have the person whose great-grandmother came from Argentina, but has never visited Latin America, and does not speak Spanish, lumped into the exact same category as a Guatemalan who just crossed the U.S. border.  One argument the book makes is that in order for all these government, market and political interests to come together, the category had to become broader in order to fit in all these ideas about Hispanics being consumers, or Hispanics being disadvantaged people.

Over time, the Hispanic identity has become based on cultural generalities such as ‘We all love our families. We are all religious and we all have some connection to the Spanish language however far back that may be.’  That’s a weakness and a strength. It was because of that ambiguity that we have the large numbers who identify as Hispanic and who have made advances.  But when you have such a broad and opaque category it’s hard to elicit and sustain passion and commitment.

Read more in her interview here 

May 4, 2014 / 899 notes

instagram:

Instagrammers Capture the Kentucky Derby

For more photos and videos from the Derby, follow @kentuckyderby on Instagram and explore the location page for the home of the Kentucky Derby, Churchill Downs. You can also browse the #kentuckyderby hashtag.

The 140th annual Kentucky Derby takes place Saturday afternoon in Louisville, Kentucky. This thoroughbred horse race, which spans two kilometers (one and a quarter miles), is known as “The Most Exciting Two Minutes in Sports” as a result of its extremely short duration.

Landon Nordeman (@landonnordeman), a photographer returning to the Derby this year to capture it for the second time, shares his enthusiasm for the event: “I love to shoot the Derby because it is the only American sporting event where fans get truly dressed up,” he explains, referring to the elaborate attire—and hats—that fans wear. “Plus,” he adds, “it has its own cocktail: the mint julep.”